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postheadericon Though dogs don’t eat nearly the number of sweets and other substances dangerous to their teeth, it still makes sense that at least some base dental care is needed to ensure that they enjoy the best health possible

Though dogs don’t eat nearly the number of sweets and other substances dangerous to their teeth, it still makes sense that at least some base dental care is needed to ensure that they enjoy the best health possible.

The first step in healthy teeth and gums is a healthy diet.  This will go a long way toward ensuring your dog’s dental health.  Bones and other chew toys are also an essential part of your dog’s dental hygiene program.  But occasionally a more hands on approach is required.

The first sign of a problem with your dog’s teeth is recurring bad breath.  This is a common sign of gum infection and must be dealt with quickly before it becomes more serious.  Bacteria are the cause of the bad breath and eradicating them will quickly freshen the dog’s mouth.  A combined effort of proper hard food, chew toys and brushing with a canine approved paste constitutes a good combined strategy.

Dogs are not overly prone to cooperation when it comes to dental hygiene.  The first few times you try to brush your dog’s teeth will be a chore to say the least.  A paste that is appealing to your dog will help ease things.  Make sure that you brush gently so as not to cause pain.  If the dog enjoys the taste of the dental paste, he will soon relax and even look forward to the brushings.  Start early with puppies and avoid having to convince an adult dog that you aren’t out to hurt him.

Do not use tooth paste designed for humans on your dog.  The fluoride and other chemicals can cause serious harm to dogs.  Dog specific pates are available from your vet or in pet stores.  Make sure you use a soft bristle brush to avoid harming the dog’s gums.  Tooth paste designed for dogs is alright to swallow and is one of the rewards for submitting to a tooth brushing.

Start the brushing slowly and only try for a few minutes.  As the dog becomes accustomed to the process, you can increase the time.  Once a week is usually good enough as long as your dog is eating enough hard kibble and has sufficient chew toys.

Don’t forget to give your dog a treat after brushing.  This is just another tool to make the dog happy to get his teeth brushed.  Pretty soon your dog will be waking you up with his toothbrush in his mouth.

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